Cryptocurrencies as an Asset Class?

Together with Sinan Krückeberg, my Ph.D. student, we have worked on a paper on cryptocurrencies and have analyzed if they form an asset class on their own. You find our interesting results in our working paper.

Abstract

Cryptocurrencies show characteristics of a distinct asset class based on strong internal correlation, an absence of correlation with any traditional asset class as well as strong market liquidity, while market stability has room for improvement. We find that for investment purposes cryptocurrencies can be distinguished into cryptographic coins and tokens. Adding a 1% allocation of cryptocurrencies to traditional portfolio structures leads to significant and persistent risk weighted outperformance. These results support the careful introduction of cryptocurrencies into the asset management mainstream.

Citation

Sinan Krückeberg & Peter Scholz (2018): Cryptocurrencies as an Asset Class? SSRN Working Paper.

Zurück in die Zukunft mit dem „Banco-Coin“

Zusammen mit meinem Doktoranden Sinan Krückeberg forsche ich zum Thema Kryptowährungen. In der Nacht des Wissen im vergangenen November haben wir einen gemeinsamen Vortrag gehalten. Dabei ging es um Fragen was Geld eigentlich ist, wie der BitCoin funktioniert und wie das Geld der Zukunft aussehen könnte.

Eine Zusammenfassung unserer Hypothesen lesen Sie in unseren Artikel auf der Seite Der Bank Blog →

Better The Devil You Know Than The Devil You Don’t — Financial Crises between Ambiguity Aversion and Selective Perception

Together with my Ph.D. students David and Sinan, we have written an article for the second edition of the International Conference on European Integration and Sustainable Development. The article will be published in The Central European Review of Economics and Management.

Abstract

During financial crises, market participants are pressurized and presumably prone to emotional biased decisions. We use the Economic Policy Uncertainty Indicator and Dow Jones Industrial Average as well as Nikkei 225 GARCH volatilities to test for ambiguity aversion and selective perception of investors. For most crises, we find a significant link between uncertainty and market volatility. However, with respect to ambiguity aversion, the causality differs between crises indicating that investors may not always be driven by uncertainty. Regarding selective perception, we find significant results for the Dot.Com and subprime crises, but not for the Japanese asset price bubble and the Asian crisis.

Citation

Peter Scholz, David Großmann & Sinan Krueckeberg (2018): Better The Devil You Know Than The Devil You Don’t — Financial Crises between Ambiguity Aversion and Selective Perception. The Central European Review of Economics and Management Vol. 2, No. 1, 155-174. Also available on SSRN.

Download Full Paper

The Golden Rule of Banking: Funding Cost Risks of Bank Business Models

 

Together with my Ph.D. student David, we have analyzed liquidity risks and therefore finished the third article for his thesis.

Abstract

The liquidity regulation of banks in Pillar 1 of the Basel framework does not consider funding cost risks of different bank business models. Therefore, we assemble a data set of balance sheet positions including maturities and use the method of Value-Liquidity-at-Risk to explore 118 European retail, wholesale, and trading banks. When examining liquidity-induced equity risks, trigged by exemplary rating shifts, we find that retail banks bear significantly lower funding cost risks than wholesale and trading banks. Consequently, a prudential regulation, which simultaneously considers the funding cost risk and the diversification of the banking system is recommended.

Citation

David Großmann & Peter Scholz (2017): The Golden Rule of Banking: Funding Cost Risks of Bank Business Models. SSRN Working Paper.

To Advise, or Not to Advise — How Robo-Advisors Evaluate the Risk Preferences of Private Investors

How good is the quality of robo-advisory? Together with Michael Tertilt, we focus in our research on the risk assessment of robo-advisors and how they translate their users‘ risk profiles into portfolio recommendations. I present this talk on the World Finance Conference 2017 in Cagliari, Italy. If you want to learn more, you will find our working paper on the SSRN network.

Automatisches Investment – Anlageempfehlung vom Robo Advisor

Entscheidungen werden heute kaum noch ohne Online-Unterstützung getroffen. Warum also nicht auch die Wahl der Vermögensanlage dem Internet überlassen? Robo Advisors versprechen effiziente, rationale und transparente Anlageempfehlungen und entwickeln sich zur digitalen Beratungsalternative. Zu ihren Empfehlungen gelangen sie auf höchst unterschiedliche Weise.

Lesen Sie meinen Artikel weiter auf der Seite Der Bank Blog →

To Advise, or Not to Advise — How Robo-Advisors Evaluate the Risk Preferences of Private Investors

In a joint work with Michael Tertilt, an HSBA alumnus of MBA Corporate Management, we analyze the current quality of robo-advice.

Abstract

Robo-advisors promise efficient, rational, and transparent investment advisory. We analyze how robo-advisors ascertain their user’s risk tolerance and which equity exposure is derived from the individual risk profile. Our findings indicate significant differences in the quality of offered investment advice. On average, robo-advisors ask relatively few questions in their user’s risk profile assessment, and it is particularly surprising that some of the questions seem not to have any impact on the risk categorization. Moreover, the recommended equity exposure is relatively conservative.

Citation

Michael Tertilt & Peter Scholz (2017): To Advise, or Not to Advise — How Robo-Advisors Evaluate the Risk Preferences of Private Investors. SSRN Working Paper.